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DIRECT BOOKING<br>BENEFITS

DIRECT BOOKING
BENEFITS

1. SAVE 10%
Pay in advance and save 10%. The rate is non-refundable, reservation cannot be changed.
2. WE TAKE CUSTOMER-ASSISTANCE PERSONALLY
When you book direct, we take account of your precise personal wishes. From our 33 different rooms, we are certain to find one that is perfect for you!
3. SPECIAL DEALS
Get the best deals such as One More Night (stay 3, pay 2), Happy Weekend (-15%), Enjoy 7 (stay 7, pay 6), Bolzano with Love (Parking inclusive) when booking directly with us.
4. BEST PRICE GUARANTEE
Your direct booking guarantees you the best price. If you do happen to find your room online at a better price, however, we will match the offer
 

213

 

Which is more inspiring – the art or the mountain view?

Room size

25 m²

Number of persons

2

LOCATION
  • At the back, with a view of the Dolomites 

AMENITIES
  • Large twin beds (200x210) made of local maple 
  • Soft down pillows and duvets 
  • Convenient bedside lighting controls 
  • Individual room temperature control 
  • Wengé wood floor, yellow-and-blue Kelim carpet 
  • Armchair and desk 
  • Kettle with TWG tea selection and instant coffee 
  • Umbrella and Greif bag 
  • Yellow marble bathroom with bathtub 

ALWAYS
  • Free Wi-Fi, safe, interactive 32“ sat-TV with radio, telephone, minibar, hairdryer, make-up mirror, bathrobe, slippers 

ON REQUEST
  • Various pillows 
  • Iron and ironing board 
  • Laundry and shoe cleaning service 
 

Kocheisen & Hullmann

 
Greek mythology is the diametric opposite of the photorealistic paintings by Kocheisen & Hullmann. In Room 213, this contrast is made clear with the drawing ’ Leda and the Swan’ (1916) by the South Tyrolean artist Hans Piffrader (1888–1950). Piffrader’s work centres on sculptures and drawings that depict the First World War in expressive, intensified visions of suffering.
 
 

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